Respiratory Disorders

COPD

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease – including Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema.

What is COPD?

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lung disease that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. In 80-90% of cases, it is caused by smoking. Other causes of COPD can include:

  • genetic reasons (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency)
  • occupational dusts and chemicals
  • second-hand smoke
  • frequent lung infections as a child
  • wood smoke and other biomass (animal dung, crop residues) fuel used for cooking.

 

COPD develops over time. In most cases, COPD is diagnosed in people over 40 years of age. Someone with COPD may not realize that they are becoming more short of breath until it becomes very hard to do simple tasks like walking up stairs. When you have COPD, your lungs are obstructed or blocked, making it hard to breathe.

  • In chronic bronchitis, your airways become swollen and can be filled with mucus, which can make it hard for you to breathe.
  • In emphysema, the air sacs (alveoli) in your lungs are damaged which can make it hard for you to breathe.

 

* The preceding was taken directly from Canadian Lung Association – https://www.lung.ca/copd.

 

Where can I go for testing? 

Find A Location Near You

 

 


 

ASTHMA

Asthma is a chronic (lifetime) disease that makes your lungs very sensitive and hard to breathe. Asthma can’t be cured, but with proper treatment, people with asthma can lead normal, active lives.

If you have asthma, your airways (breathing passages) are very sensitive. Certain things can make your airways become:

  • Swollen and filled with mucus – the swelling and mucus makes your airways narrower, so it is hard for air to pass through.
  • Small and tight – your airways might also become twitchy and squeeze together and tighten. This makes your airways narrower and hard for air to pass through.

 

With proper diagnosis, treatment, and preventative measures during cold and flu season, asthma can be managed.  The gold standard for asthma diagnosis is spirometry.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* The preceding was taken directly from Canadian Lung Association – https://www.lung.ca/asthma, https://www.lung.ca/news/latest-news/survey-asthma-not-well-controlled-most-canadians

 

Where can I go for testing?

Find A Location Near You